25% of Big Trucks in Texas Pose Safety Risks

Texas-Truck-Inspections-Show-Dangers

Almost one in four 18-wheelers and other commercial vehicles inspected by Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) officers last month were in violation of major safety rules, a clear indication the trucking industry isn’t doing enough to police their own and protect other drivers on the road.

Unbelievably, commercial truck companies and others were even warned beforehand that TxDOT would be making these inspections!

Among the most common violations were faulty brakes and defective tires, according to TxDOT. Based on my experience taking bad trucking companies and drivers to court, defective brakes and tires also are major factors in truck crash deaths.

More than 1,000 Citations Issued

TxDOT inspected nearly 8,000 commercial vehicles June 5-7 at various checkpoints throughout the state. The annual event was widely publicized as Roadcheck 2018. The inspections resulted in:

  • 1,975 18-wheelers, buses and other commercial vehicles placed out of service for safety violations
  • 1,258 citations and 18,178 warnings
  • 301 drivers were sidelined for failure to possess the proper commercial license or for driving more hours than safety rules allow

Kudos to TxDOT

The major trucking companies tend do a good job at keeping their fleets maintained and screening their drivers. But the independents are a different matter. Many of my clients were victims of undertrained, tired truck drivers at the wheels of poorly maintained, unsafe trucks. Truck crash lawsuits are the only legitimate way for victims to obtain justice for horrific injuries or deaths of loved ones. Lawsuits also serve to drive bad operators out of business.

These latest statistics bear out the dangers commercial trucks continue to pose on our roadways. Yes, car drivers are often at fault. But there’s no question that in a crash between a truck and a car, the car’s occupants are more likely to die.

Kudos to TxDOT for shining a spotlight on trucks violating safety rules. Maybe next time they can skip the pre-warnings and bag even more unsafe trucks.