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Can I Get a Lump Sum for Workers’ Compensation?

After suffering a work-related injury or illness, you may wonder whether you can receive your benefits in a one-time lump sum payment rather than having compensation provided to you on a regular basis.

There are many reasons why you may want to have your settlement paid this way, but it’s important to understand the implications of making such a decision.

Texas Workers’ Compensation Lump Sum Payment

According to §408.128 of the Texas Workers’ Compensation Act, you are allowed to receive your impairment income benefits as a lump sum payment if you’ve returned to work for at least three months. In order to qualify, you must have earned at least 80% of your average weekly wage.

In addition, you will only be eligible for Supplemental Income Benefits at the end of the impairment period, and you must have an impairment rating of 15% or higher. You must also have tried, in good faith, to obtain employment aligned with your ability to work.

Keep in mind that if you choose to receive a lump-sum payment of your impairment income benefits, you cannot later obtain supplemental income benefits or any other income benefits for your injury or illness. However, medical benefits related to the injury will not be impacted by receiving a lump sum.

The Information You Must Provide for a Lump Sum Payment

If you choose to have the compensation provided in a one-time lump sum payment, you’ll be required to fill out the DWC Form-051. The information you must provide on this form includes:

  • Your name
  • Telephone number
  • The date you were injured
  • Your mailing address
  • Your employer’s business name
  • Your employer’s insurance carrier’s name
  • The maximum medical improvement date as determined by a physician
  • Your impairment rating
  • The doctor’s name who provided the impairment rating
  • Whether or not your insurance provider disputes the rating
  • The weekly impairment income benefit amount
  • The date you returned to work
  • Your current pay rate
  • Whether or not you’ve returned to work for at least three months
  • Your signature and the date you signed the form

If you’ve suffered an on-the-job injury, our team wants to help you receive the maximum compensation possible. Call us today with any questions you may have.

Contact our office by calling (361) 541-6333 or by filling out the online contact form.

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